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Old African solutions to the annual challenge of weaning calves have found their way to Australia via the EasyWean nosering.

Native African herders managing their communal cattle herds have long put devices on the noses of older calves to prevent them suckling.

 

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Article - better weaning strategy

In their quest for better pastures, Arcadia Valley graziers Matthew and Maryellen Peart have changed how they go about weaning.

The Pearts, who wean 400-500 calves in their certified EU-organic beef operation at “Bundaleer”, 90 km north of Injune, began time-controlled grazing in the late 1990s to address pasture decline. → Read more

Article about EasyWean in Qld Country Life April 2011Qld Country Life April 2011

Weaning means stress, and stress means weight loss. That didn’t suit Lancelin, WA, beef producer and tagasaste pioneer Bob Wilson, who has developed a weaning strategy that usually results in his calves—and cows—gaining weight over a period when they would normally lose it.

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Farm weekly article

For most cattle producers, weaning is about bellowing cattle, stressed fences and loss of condition.

But not for New England grazier Christopher Wright who during this year’s weaning recorded an average weight gain of 0.64kg a day in his calves. → Read more

Country Life article 2010

Weaning was once the most loathed event on Peter Cahill’s calendar. These days, thanks to some African-developed technology, he hardly notices it – and the calves seem to notice even less.

For the past five years, Mr Cahill has weaned his calves while they run in the same mob with their mothers, courtesy of a nosering that prevents the calves from suckling. → Read more

Farm Weekly 2009

Weaning cattle using noserings will cost graziers almost half that of yard weaned stock, according to a trial undertaken by the Department of Regional Development, Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources (DRDPIFR) in Alice Springs.

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Qld Country Life Beef Annual 2008

The negative effect of stress on people’s health is well known, but graziers too are beginning to appreciate that it has the same effect on their herds. Poor nutrition due to weaning stress contributes to health problems in young cattle.

The conventional approach of abruptly separating cows from calves at weaning is very different to the slow and gradual weaning process that would occur naturally. Yard weaned calves show a higher tendency to stress related diseases, while their mothers also lose condition. → Read more

Farm Weekly 2007

Using a weaning device is not normally associated with the dairy industry as most calves are taken off their mothers at birth and bottle fed. But this practice often leads to calves attempting to suckle each other, potentially causing future udder damage and loss of milk production.

Dairy farmers across

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Australia have found a solution to this problem by using an anti-suckling device on their calves. → Read more

Farm Weekly July 2006

Whether it is Bos Indicus, British, Euro or composite cattle being bred; weaning calves involves the two phases of separation of calf from cow, and cessation of the cow’s lactation.

These events can cause considerable stress and potential weight loss but EasyWean® noserings can offer an alternative. → Read more

The Land article June 2006

The hallmarks of the annual calf weaning – lots of bellowing, roaming of fence lines and weight loss – are disappearing on some properties, to be replaced by a ferocious-looking nose ring.

The EasyWean® nosering, distinguished by its bright orange colour and blunt spikes, was developed in South Africa to allow calves to remain in the same herd as their mother, but to stop them visiting the udder. → Read more